Vehicles aren’t cheap! When it’s time for you to invest in a vehicle – whether that means a budget car for a daily commute or a fancy boat with all of the bells and whistles – you’ll want to make absolutely sure that you’re getting the best deal possible. Even so-called “economy” cars cost tens of thousands of dollars, and vehicles designed for recreation – including motor homes and boats – are priced as if only the rich are supposed to have fun! Thankfully, there are a few things that you can do to keep costs down when you’re shopping for a boat or a motor vehicle. And there’s no better way to get a discount than to buy a used vehicle.

Used vehicles give you more for less

 

It doesn’t take a genius to see the basic appeal of buying a used car or boat: the vehicle will be cheaper!

Cars and boats lose a great deal of their value when they’re sold to their first owner by the boat or car dealership. Imagine buying a brand new car and then driving it five miles home. That’s the length of a test drive, so the car is still, for (almost) all intents and purposes, completely new. But if you wanted to sell it, could you get the sticker price?

Absolutely not! The moment the car leaves the lot with its first owner, its value plummets. That’s a bummer for anyone trying to sell a car after just a year or two, but it’s great news for anyone who is looking to buy a relatively new used vehicle. If you’re willing to get a car that’s just a year or two old instead of brand new, the savings can be remarkable. The car will be nearly new, but the price tag will reflect the curious ways in which we value cars – in other words, it will be quite low!

Protect yourself when buying a used vehicle

 

In a perfect world, you’d be able to find nearly new cars and boats for sale from reputable folks all over. There are always a few people out there that have to have the very newest thing – the sorts of people who will sell their cars off every year or two just to buy the slightly newer model of the same car. It would be nice if these were the only sorts of used cars on the market – but, of course, that’s not true.

When buying used cars and boats, you have to watch out for folks who are trying to unload vehicles with serious problems. If you’re buying directly from an individual, be careful! If you can, have a mechanic you trust look at the vehicle before you pay anything for it.

It’s safer to turn to a larger-scale dealer when buying used. Look for a marina, dealer, or large-scale website that offers used boats for sale. The same goes for cars. The logic is obvious: a car dealership has a reputation to uphold, while an individual may sell you a clunker and disappear. Most car dealerships offer some used vehicles, including the big and trustworthy ones affiliated with major manufacturers.